Archive for January, 2015

Younger Children Feel Lasting Effects of Divorce

Monday, January 26th, 2015

Young children have a more difficult time establishing close relationships with their parents later in life, according to new research.

The research, which was published online June 28 and in the September 2013 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, concludes that children whose parents divorced when they were between birth and 3 to 5 years old had a greater level of parental insecurity than children whose parents divorced when they were older.

“A person who has a secure relationship with a parent is more likely than someone who is insecure to feel that they can trust the parent,” said R. Chris Fraley, associate professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and co-author of the study. “Such a person is more comfortable depending on the parent and is confident that the parent will be psychologically available when needed.”

Fraley and graduate student Marie Heffernan completed two studies that analyzed the effects of divorce on children’s relationships with their parents. They surveyed 7,735 people about their personalities and close relationships, and more than one-third of those surveyed came from homes of divorce.

Fraley explained the importance of these findings in determining how people form close relationships after witnessing the end of their parents’ marriage.

“People’s relationships with their parents and romantic partners play important roles in their lives,” Fraley said. “This research brings us one step closer to understanding why it is that some people have relatively secure relationships with close others whereas others have more difficulty opening up to and depending on important people in their lives.”

Marital Debt

Thursday, January 15th, 2015

Just as a divorcing couple must divide what they own, so they must divide what they owe. The piper must be paid.



Credit card companies are not bound by a divorcing couple’s property agreement. In all jurisdictions, joint credit card debt is jointly owned because each spouse has joint and several liability for the obligation. Even when one spouse agrees to take on a debt, if it has the other spouse’s name on it — or in some cases, even it does not — the creditor has the right to come after both spouses for payment.



When debt cannot be paid off, it must be divided. The classification of debt, like the classification of assets, is a preliminary to the distribution. Most jurisdictions hold that the debts must be allocated between the spouses. In distribution, courts consider who incurred the debt and who benefited from it; which spouse is better position to pay it off; and the debt’s relation to a particular asset.

As a rule, secured marital debts must be offset by the value of the asset they encumber. Unsecured marital debt is allocated so that each spouse receives an equitable share of the net balance of the estate. 

Generally, only marital debt is divided, which means any debt incurred for the joint benefit of the parties during the marriage. Joint benefit does not necessarily mean joint use. Debts incurred in the hope of creating marital property are marital.

Debt division depends upon whether the divorcing couple lives in a community property or equitable division jurisdiction. In a community property state, a spouse is responsible for debts incurred during the marriage and it does not matter whose name is on them. In an equitable distribution state, debts in one spouse’s name are his or hers alone, but a spouse is responsible for debts taken in his or her name, even those without his or her consent.